The Class of 1975 Welcomes the Class of 2025

Through Dartmouth’s intergenerational relationship opportunities, alumni offer advice and encouragement to the newest generation of students. 

Students participate in matriculation

Each fall, a new class of students arrives in Hanover eager to discover what Dartmouth life will be like. They come from unique backgrounds, communities, and families around the world that have prepared them for this next exciting chapter in their lives. 

One of the best ways to prepare students for what lies ahead is to hear from those who have walked the Dartmouth student path before. That’s why the custom of forging a connection between the 50-year reunion class and the incoming first year students is a cherished way to pass along wisdom, Dartmouth lore, and traditions. 

 

Matriculation to Commencement: The Ties that Bind the ’75s with the ’25s

From matriculation to commencement, there is a special connection between the 50-year alumni class and their younger counterparts. At matriculation, incoming students meet the president of the College in his or her office to shake hands and receive a warm welcome, as well as some brief remarks from the president. Another integral part of this memorable day is the presentation of pins to the new class.

Photo of D pin

Through a program run by Dartmouth’s Alumni Volunteer Engagement department, the 50-year class is connected to the incoming class for opportunities for mentoring, networking, and building intergenerational relationships. Once the ’25s have matriculated, a class member will be chosen to act as a class connections representative to help facilitate opportunities for the ’25s to connect with the ’75s.

The Class of 1975 will also be present when the Class of 2025 celebrates the culmination of their Dartmouth experience at commencement, when the 50-year reunion class marches in with the graduating class at the ceremony. 


Admissions Interviews Provide an Early Introduction between Alumni and the New Class

Because of its global applicant pool, Dartmouth Admissions uses alumni volunteers all over the world to conduct admissions interviews. In 2021, six members of the class of 1975 interviewed students who were ultimately admitted to the class of 2025. 

Laura Gordon Kutnick ’75 made a special connection with one of her applicant interviewees whose interests and experiences mirrored her own as a young Dartmouth applicant:

I was particularly impressed with one young woman who took me back full circle to when I first applied. As an American working with Mother Teresa in India during my senior year, I fondly remember first being introduced to Dartmouth by a Peace Corps volunteer named Tom Wolf (yes, the future Governor of PA). Now fifty years later, before me was a present-day version of myself—a young Indian woman living in the U.S., who enjoyed dressing up like one of Dr. Seuss’s characters (my favorite) and wanted to build tiny houses around the world. I hope she will continue to pass forward the Dartmouth tradition!”

Interviewers from the Class of ’75 were also able to share their best advice with the incoming class about how to make the most of their Dartmouth experience. Michael Hutton-Woodland ’75 said: 

A man in a blue sweater standing in front of a volcano in Iceland

Allow Dartmouth to open you to new experiences, and dive in.  Realize that the people you meet there could become your dear friends for life, and nurture those important connections. Above all, pursue your dharma, your purpose, and identify the important questions that only you can answer.

  • Michael Hutton-Woodland ’75

 


 

The special relationship between 50-year classes and their first-year counterparts is a way that Dartmouth tradition support the intergenerational connections that help the spirit of Dartmouth remain alive. The Class of 1975 is no doubt excited for the incoming class and wishes them all the best as they embark on their Dartmouth journey. 

50 year reunion class walking behind man in graduation regalia
The Class of 1968 during the 2018 Commencement exercises.